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it came to foreign-policy. years later he told former aide frank gannon during a series of interviews that pat always handled herself properly even during sensitive diplomatic conversations that she might inadvertently overhear. he explained that she quote listens and nods but never makes comments of our own. at same time however he relied on her to notice things he did not because as he put it, she was very observant. giving pat some responsibility and small diplomatic tasks also provided nixon with cover when they increasingly vocal feminist demanded a role in local policy. she was a woman he could trust to do only what he expected her to do. pats foreign travel did more than gifford desire for venture visiting new places, it was a way of reconnecting her husband and to the dick and pat t-mobile. she'd never been more part of his life and work than when they travel together during the vice presidency years. president so years. circling the circumstances had changed. now they traveled with a huge entourage of aids, security personnel and reporters. her husband's faith in her abilitie
what is your source of power? after all she doesn't have any foreign-policy experience but she attends national security council meetings. she's often in the most important domestic meetings regarding the economy. no one gets to see the president without first going through valerie jarrett so what is this power that she has. the only explanation i can come up with after all these interviews i did was that she had given the first lady first lady and the president the impression that she had there back and she is protecting them from a hostile world if you will, a world in which people could come to see the president and make proposals that would not be to their liking. so for instance, when as an example, when the president wanted to do a mandate requiring religious institutions to provide free medical care, i'm sorry, health insurance for abortions and contraception, bill daily who was then the chief of staff, brad archbishop dolan from new york, the catholic archbishop who is now cardinal dolan, to speak to the president. valerie was obviously posted this mandate. when valerie jarrett
at the peer review journal of foreign policy and the senior contributor to the. [indiscernible] which many of us, the first things we looked at in the morning. >> after? >> after. and a member of the court association of america. the clerk for the hon. warship berge john and barquette . and while a law student he was an editor from the yale law journal. i believe that is accredited. so as you can see, at two very talented. their debate is entitled to, detention policies. the way we set it up was we have -- in the book we will do it as live. steven will start and then will have great respond. >> great. thank you. it's a pleasure to be here. >> seven the fortitude to invite me to participate. i am a firm believer that the best they we can do as academics is raise the level debate. projects like this can only help in that regard with folks actually engaging with each other as opposed to talking past each other. let me offer couple of brief remarks that i lost a consistent with what i said in the book. i want to suggest that of all the myriad questions one could ask about the future of u.s. de
are making on the vigor transforming the role of the day so very unfortunate results. you talk about foreign policy as being at least two ideas or and although she's in play and i would be interested -- i keep on thinking that you are a vietnam analogy by and we must stand tough but you wouldn't subscribe to that. >> it's a special representation in the first place which dominates the rest of the book and in vietnam i think you have to take them both together. you cannot be in munich or vietnam. munich is an ethnology that tends to thrive when the country has been in peace and prosperity for long enough it feels it can do anything. it feels it can intervene on behalf of subject and oppressed people around the world and it doesn't think about the cost it hasn't had to pay the cost for several decades now. vietnam is about taking care of one's own the and paying attention to how things can go wrong despite the best of intentions. if he were a total vietnam person you will be such a realist that would be crude you wouldn't have anything on the interest and to the nation requires ideals for the
on the non-fiction selections. these titles were included in foreign policy magazines must read books to give in breakout nations in pursuit of the next economic miracles on the set is another author we want to introduce you to a and this is brian. here is his book castor's secrets the cia and the intelligence machine. if you could start by giving us your background, particularly your cia background. >> i worked at the national intelligence council in washington for about 45 years. i ultimately became the national intelligence officer for latin america which is a tree or four-star military equivalent but it's a pretty substantial position and i had the responsibility for all of latin america and cuba and the analytical side of intelligence. estimate what does that mean? >> i was not a field operative. i didn't go out and conduct espionage or meet foreign agents. i was basically most of my career at the headquarters in virginia i had the national intelligence estimates, quite a few on cuba over the years, and many of the other latin american countries. >> before we get into fidel castro and th
think having programs that help manufacturers identify foreign markets and resources is critical. the third, i think you have to look at trade and tax policies. there is no doubt in my mind that china's policies are unfair, and not just to american workers. in my judgment, they are unfair to their own middle class. they are supporting elite exporters who have crony relationships with the regime at the expense of giving consumers access to the best products in the world, and we have to make economic fairness of the highest priority in our bilateral relationships with china, and then on tax policy, we have to look at how do we insent vise manufacturers with the right tax credits to invest in the united states? thank you. >> i wondered about obama's national export initiative, doubling them by 2014 if i'm correctly. >> i didn't plant the question. [laughter] >> so i was just wondering, first of all, what do we export? like, what would you say are the strengths where you export, and secondly, what do you think can be done by the government or other institutions in order to promote th
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6